50 Quick Ways to Help Your Students Think, Learn and Use Their Brains Brilliantly




50 Quick Ways to Help Your Students Think, Learn and Use Their Brains Brilliantly

It’s so important for students to use their brains effectively in school. If they don’t, they run the risk of not realising their potential. What is more, they simply won’t learn as much!

This is a problem educators all over the world face. I was sitting thinking about it one day and then an idea came to me. Why not write a book which can help teachers to get their students thinking, learning and using their brains brilliantly?

Well, I thought, let’s do it.

And so that’s how the last entry in the Quick 50 Teaching Series came about. The book is filled with innovative, exciting ideas, tips and activities you can use with your classes. Here’s a free preview to give you a little taste of what’s in store:

Why? Cards

01 Why, oh why, oh why?

Why this and why that?

Why, why, why, why, why?

Why not make a set of cards for each table in your classroom containing a set of ‘Why?’ questions on them?

Why not ask students to pull cards out of the decks at random and use them to quiz each other (or themselves)?

Why not have a set of cards at the front of the room and pull ‘Why?’ questions out yourself to put to the whole class?

Why not use the ‘Why?’ cards when you are questioning students?

Why not encourage pupils to walk around the room using the ‘Why’ cards to question each other?

Why not?

Thought Bubbles

02 What is going on inside our heads? What is going on inside other people’s heads? If it’s our own heads, usually the best thing to do is to have a think and maybe do a bit of talking or some writing. If it’s other people’s heads, we need to get them to communicate with us in some way.

Here are two examples of how you can use thought bubbles to help pupils think about what is inside their own heads as well as what is inside other people’s heads:

– Display an image on the board containing one or more people. Have a thought bubble coming off the top of one of the people’s heads and ask students to discuss in pairs what they might be thinking and why.

– Ask students to draw a thought bubble and then to fill it in with everything they are thinking about the lesson (and you could follow up by asking them to discuss their filled-in thought bubbles with a partner).

50 Quick Ways to Help Your Students Think, Learn and Use Their Brains Brilliantly here. Drop me a line to let me know what you think or write a review. I hope the book helps you to get your students thinking, learning and using their brains brilliantly!

Mike Gershon